Who Owns Yoga? The people!…and the documentary is pretty interesting too…

Trying to answer the question, “Who owns yoga?” this Al Jazeera documentary is a pretty fascinating look at current trends in the yoga community, highlighting the variety and creativity of the modern yoga practice (which sort of drives me crazy sometimes, but to each their own…) as well as the tension between the ancient spiritual practice and the ancient never-ending desire to make a buck.

The documentary’s apparently been out for a few months, so perhaps you’ve already seen it, but I just came across it last night on Yoga International’s website and thought I’d share in case it hadn’t hit your radar. If you’re interested in yoga, it’s pretty entertaining from start to finish and includes a great cast of characters from the modern yoga community.

Pocket Yoga-Practice Builder iOS App Gets a Great Update…and we’ve got redemption codes!

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I’m sure most of us enjoy a little spontaneity in our yoga practice, but there’s also a lot to be said for showing up to a yoga class with a prepared teacher that puts on a smooth-flowing class.  I do most of my yoga at home, but I don’t have many worse yoga pet peeves than practicing with an online yoga video where the teacher goes through a bunch of asanas for one side of the body and forgets to do the same thing for the other side.

Frustrating, distracting, and seems to happen all to often given the frailty and forgetfulness of the human mind…

Fear not! Pocket Yoga-Practice Builder, an iOS app I’ve used for a long time, came out with a great update this week that adds the ability to create repeating sequences with the app and export the sequence to a downloadable PDF. Very helpful for teachers planning classes or even us home-practitioners who like to plan our practices out.  And most importantly, no more forgotten poses!  Just build the routine, roll out the mats, and practice or teach away.

The app makes it easy to create routines, adjust pose duration, and even add your own music.

PBcreate@2xHere’s a sample practice PDF and click here to check out a video with an overview of what Yoga Builder has to offer.

That’s all good news, but the best news for you is that we have 10 free download codes (currently priced at $6.99) to give away! 

To Enter:  Since yoga apps make it super simple to practice yoga just about anywhere, comment below on the weirdest place you’ve ever practiced yoga and you could be one of our random winners!

Update (12 Jan 15): Contest closed… Thanks for sharing the creative and crazy places you’ve busted out a yoga move or two! 10 lucky yogis are now having a fun time building yoga sequences with Pocket Yoga-Practice Builder. Have an amazing week!

Sacred Sound: Mantras & Chants

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Many years ago when I started a yoga practice, I had no idea what it would reveal to me. I was just hoping for a little extra strength and flexibility, and I did what I could to avoid all the spiritual trappings of the practice. But, somehow, as it does, the yoga did its job. Over the years it brought me through physical, psychological, and emotional revelations that I can’t imagine would have taken place otherwise.

One of the most powerful insights has come through the use of sound and mantra as a basis for the practice. I was born with a hearing impairment that gave me a unique relationship to sound. As a child, I would feel sound, vibration, tone, and intonation in order to more fully access my world. This was second nature to me, but through my studies of yoga (and physics!), I suddenly found a reason behind my special relationship to sound. Just as important, through yoga’s rich mythology, I also gained context and meaning to better understand how the inner and outer practices of yoga work. It is from this perspective that I have always practiced and taught, fueled by the belief that sound has the power to harmonize us and myth brings forth what is alive within us. It is in this spirit that I always end my lectures and workshops with these words: Don’t miss the vibrations.

Mantras and Chants

A mantra, as it relates to the yogic and Vedic traditions of India, is a Sanskrit phrase that encapsulates some higher idea or ideal within the cadence, vibration, and essence of its sound. A mantra can be as simple as a single sound — such as chanting the well-known sound  — or as complicated as chanting a poem that tells a grand story or gives instruction. Whatever mantra is chanted, no matter how long or short, the purpose is the same: it is meant to act like a skeleton key to help you bypass the mundane matters and mental chatter of the day-to-day mind in order to reach a transcendent state of awareness and self-realization that is, quite frankly, indescribable. Every yogic practice provides the means for us to do this — such as äsana (postures), meditation, and präëäyäma (breath work) — but mantra practice and näda yoga are uniquely simple and universal. If you can form a thought, you can do a mantra practice. The simple act of thinking a mantra is a start to a genuine practice. The silent repetition of the sound oà while driving, for example, can be a starting point. Eventually, our practice might grow to include chanting while meditating, attending lively mantra-based musical performances (kirtan, or kértana), or perhaps even chanting a longer mantra 108 times aloud to celebrate the New Year. As I’ve said, there is no wrong way to use a mantra.

In the United States, mantra has gained popularity largely through the musical kirtan (kértana) tradition. Popular kirtan musicians such as Krishna Das, Deva Premal, and Dave Stringer have brought these Eastern chants to life by giving them some good old American rock-and-roll flair. While the kirtan tradition in India began around the ninth century, its look and feel hasn’t changed much even as it has evolved to incorporate Western musical proclivities. It has always had (and still has) a fairly simplistic call-and-response-type format, where the leader will chant a phrase that is repeated by the audience. This typically becomes more lively and fast as the chant continues. In India, various instruments are used — typically the harmonium (similar to an accordion in a box), the tabla (classical Indian drum set), and the cartals (tiny cymbals). Those instruments are still present in many kirtan settings today, yet the music is often Westernized through the incorporation of all sorts of instruments, like the guitar, bass, and even a proper Western drum kit (like how Chris Grosso and I perform!). What is wonderful about many of these yogic and Vedic traditions is that they are quite malleable. So long as the intention is still sealed within the practice, the practice — even if it is modernized and Westernized — does not lose its efficacy.

So while some choose to chant mantras in a kirtan setting, others have long used mantra in spiritual practice in accordance with daily rituals, meditation, or as a way to bind fellow students of a tradition. Many use a mantra during their morning worship practice to invoke an intention or particular deity. Many practitioners also stay focused in their meditation practice by silently or quietly chanting a mantra. And some traditions claim certain mantras as part of their tradition — almost like a secret handshake. In many Eastern spiritual traditions, it is common at the beginning and end of a spiritual practice to chant a mantra or . Mantras are also commonly used as prayers for peace, health, or well-being. Mantras can be used to focus the mind and empower whatever spiritual practice we embark on. Mantra is fuel for the inner spiritual fire.

I encourage you to simply begin a mantra practice in whatever way that feels right, using my book Sacred Sound. and/or the mantra library on my website (www.bit.ly/mantralibrary), as a guide . Start simple, such as with om, and incorporate other, longer, or more complex mantras as they resonate with you. Some mantras may appeal to you because of their sound, while others may become attractive as you understand their context, underlying mythology, and intention. Over time, as you use each mantra in your life and practice, it will become like a friend whom you come to know more and more deeply. The mantra may start out as a little gem that lightens your day, but after years of saying it, it may also become a bright light that guides you through the darkest of times. Through practice, we make these mantras our own so they help us on our spiritual journey.

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AlannaKaivalya2_cEditor’s note: This is a guest post by Alanna Kaivalya, author of some of my favorite yoga books, including her recently released Sacred SoundShe is the yoga world’s expert on Hindu mythology and mysticism. Her podcasts have been heard by more than one million people worldwide, and her Kaivalya Yoga Method melds mythology, philosophy, and yoga. Visit her online at http://www.alannak.com.

 Adapted from the book Sacred Sound © 2014 by Alanna Kaivalya. Printed with permission of New World Library, Novato, CA. www.newworldlibrary.com.

Lululemon Pledges a Perfect Fit for Your Next Yoga Pants

This is about as breaking as news gets in the yoga world, so we had to share.  Perhaps inspired by the infamous comments of lululemon’s founder, lulu’s latest product offering/innovation appears to be a yoga pant that fits any body, shape, or size…

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Here’s the specs on the pants in case you’re still wondering whether this is a good option for you:

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Goodbye pants, hello comfort…Have a nice weekend!

A.U.M…(Almighty Universal Magnetic)…by MC Yogi…definitely going on repeat

aum - mc yogi - 2Time to turn up the volume! MC Yogi just released a sweet new music video that has me pumped about his new album, Mantras, Beats & Meditations, set to release on April 1. His videos always have great visuals, but A.U.M. may be my new favorite. It’s tough to beat the combination of great lyrics, thumping beat, and some impressive yoga poses.

Happy weekend!

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